Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Daily Pump Trap: 10/25/11 edition

Good morning! Between October 20 and October 24, there were 106 new positions posted on the ACS Careers website. Of these, 28 (27%) of them are academically connected.

Santa Clara, CA: Agilent Laboratories is looking for a M.S. synthetic chemist; solid-phase technique experience preferred. Column support work?

Smmmmmokin'!: R.J. Reynolds is looking for a B.S./M.S. flavor chemist: "seeking an experienced chemist with knowledge of the chemical, physical, and organoleptic properties of flavor compounds to support the development of tobacco products consistent with R.J. Reynolds' Growth, Innovation and Harm Reduction Platforms." Fascinating; 2+ years in flavor chemistry desired.

Columbus, OH: GFS Chemicals desires a chemical engineer for "equipment install and maintenance, SOP development, process safety review, waste treatment oversight, and process development." 5-10 years experience in chemical manufacturing desired.

Greenfield, IN: Covance (the Lilly-connected CRO) is looking for a M.S./Ph.D. MRI staff scientist. "Must also possess the following: experience with MRI/S principles and applications, as well as the development of MRI/S acquisition methods; experience with aspects of in vivo and hypothesis-driven research and image/spectrum analysis techniques; experience with Unix-based computers and small-animal MRI spectrometer acquisition software, such as Varian VnmrJ or Bruker Paravision; experience utilizing animal models; experience handling and anesthetizing small animals (mice, rats)."

Say what, anesthetizing small animals? Oh.

Zeroes!: BASF is looking for a B.S./M.S./Ph.D. chemist/chemical engineer to perform research on FCC catalysts (whatever those are.) "Strong background in catalysis required", but 0-3 years industrial experience in catalysis okay.

I get the feeling that BASF is really trying to expand its staff these days. If I had a nickel...

MMEERRCCKK: 63 positions (56%) of the total number of positions. Boy, I wish they didn't count for the bulk of them, these days. 


  1. I think FCC = face-centered cubic metals. Pt or Cu particles dispersed on high-surface area support materials.

  2. While I too would have gone with the crystal structure hypothesis, it makes a bit more sense that it's petroleum refining...also known as cracking.


    Old school industrial chemistry FOR. THE. M'F'ing. WIN.

    Sometimes I wish I had been born in the 40s man, other than the whole segregation thing.

  3. nmc: Let's talk. E-mail me. chemjobber -at- gmail/dot/com.

  4. Petroleum refining? Everything old is new again! Check out this list...


    Looks like it may be a good time to be an extractive metallurgist.