Wednesday, April 9, 2014

We're right on schedule


9 comments:

  1. Need to get this tattooed - on my forehead!

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    1. Most projects I have worked on the Gantt Chart's get carved in stone by PM/Sr Management as the defined schedule so never get changed to reflect reality (which means day 2 starts). Perhaps I can suggest your procedure the next time a PM presents a Gantt that know is doomed to not align in a rationale world although probably will need to place across their backs (unless just show Start Date and End Date summary)

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  2. I've always found Gantt Charts to be totally useless, but it seems the people in shiny suits are very fond of them. This one gave me a wry smile.

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  3. I know the feeling. I just spent the better part of a month trying to figure out why my system suddenly started failing every time after six months of working just fine. It turned out to be the temperature of a solvent removal step early in the process. This is confusing because

    1: I didn't change anything concerning the solvent removal step, so why the sudden shift to complete failure after dozens of samples which had no problems?

    2: There is no plausible mechanism by which a 10C change in the solvent removal step would effect final performance. These temperatures are 100C below where any meaningful chemistry happens in this system and many steps removed from the final product.

    Sometimes, chemistry just makes me want to pound my head on the wall.

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    1. "Sometimes, chemistry just makes me want to pound my head on the wall."

      Yes. But then the problem gets solved, and there is a brief happy dance in the lab before the next ugly problem rears its head.

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    2. In my experience, that usually happens the next day.

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  4. Hey, Chemjobber, have you been lurking invisibly in my lab? :-)

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  5. I need a printed copy to hang on every manager's office wall in my firm!!!!!

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  6. The problem with projects is that once things are 'delivered' then people lose interest very quickly. Even those projects that have a 'lessons learned' activity post-hoc often put the findings of this activity in the project documentation, which is never looked at again, ever.

    I'm sure there are organisations that do this kind of cross-project learning well, but they aren't anyone I've worked for. The project organisation combined with the immediate requirements of a commercial environment seem to lend themselves to businesses being doomed to repeat the same mistakes over and over again on similar projects.

    All a bit depressing really.

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