Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Every methodology table you've ever seen, by SeeArrOh



In SeeArrOh's wanderings on the Internet, he happened to come across this table in a rough draft of a paper intended for a high-impact journal. It's nice to see such structurally diverse molecules be subjected to this group's oxidation technique. 

9 comments:

  1. At first it was funny, but then I noticed the similar yields and noticed that the last substrate has a pyridine in it that doesn't seem to affect yield. Then I also noticed that it's a method for catalytic, selective oxidation of aliphatics and not aromatics, actually... so it's not such a bad reaction after all and the competition might only be in the tens. I'd have to see the catalyst loading and oxidant identity as well as the type of metal and results with secondary alcohols to tell you if this is ACS journal material though.

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  2. We all know that Magtrieve™ is really the way to go. Always.

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  3. Where is the introductory phrase "XXXX are valuable intermediates in pharmaceutical synthesis"?

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  4. Ah, yields. Reminds me of a story told by Carl Djerassi where he mentions a woman working for him at Syntex during the early days of steroid chemistry. This lady didn't have a college degree but was very hardworking and diligent. Problem was, she used to get exactly the same yield every single time she ran a reaction, down to a decimal point. It turned out she was balancing out the differences; a 90% yield would lead her to hoard some of the product in a drawer and an 85% yield would prompt her to add the previous product to the new one. I still can't say whether she was being dishonest or not.

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  5. And the first 2 entries prove the procedure is truly reproducible. ;-)

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  6. I'm looking for a summer intern in synthetic organic chemistry. If you are in your second, third, or fourth year of undergrad, send me your CV and research summary (what you have done before). It's at a major pharmaceutical company in San Francisco bay area.
    MPHchemistry - at - gmail - dot - com

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  7. Say, MPHchemistry, usually if you email CJ directly (chemjobber_AT_gmail.com), he's usually pretty open to giving you your own post, and thus the ability to attract many more candidates!

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  8. See Arr Oh..... This is fabulous!!!! AHAHAAHAHAHA!!!!

    CJ...Thanks for sharing. Good stuffs, guys..

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  9. How about the "beats out the big-name-professors yield for distantly related chemisty"

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