Monday, December 10, 2012

2011 ACS officer salaries


The latest ACS Form 990. (2011)

Click to see bonuses and other incentives.

21 comments:

  1. Don't think of your salary as bad in comparison. Think of it as a 'nano'-salary. It's the salary of the future.

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  2. What do the 10.00 and 55.00 mean? Are those measures of effort (like, half-time?)

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  3. Hours per week: They all work 11 hours a day. They guard the job market perimeter fence so that we could sleep in peace at night; they wont let any jobs in.

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    1. And we thought grad students had it rough! Eleven hours a day for only seven-figure salaries... really makes you think, don't it?

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  4. I'm sure that these are the salaries necessary to be competitive. Imagine how much worse off the ACS would be if salaries were half that.
    Imagine how different things would be if Dr Jacobs salary was pegged to the average ACS member's wage including the unemployed. Think she would be less sanguine about the job market?

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    1. If it were possible to 'like' a comment here on chemjobber, I would doubly like this one.

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    2. "Dr" Jacobs? Who's that? From ACS website:
      Education: B.S. in chemistry (with honors and distinction), George Washington University, 1968; graduate work in organic chemistry, University of Maryland, 1969.

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    3. My apologies. I just assumed that someone in her position would have a PhD. I need to remember what assuming does.

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    4. Sorry, didn't mean to sound too jerky. But yeah, you would think that, and yet just look at the list: Jacobs, Baum... 8/11 and 9/11 of the two tables are not PhD holders. Hard to believe they're out of touch with the membership at large!

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  5. No wonder the ACS executives do such a poor job idetifying wth us rank and file members.

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  6. Look at page 80. It show the salary and the "bonus/incentive" pay.

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  7. Very interesting document. So, 82% of their revenue is from information services and 3.5% from education and membership (part VIII section 2). That explains quite a lot. They are basically an information services organization, not a professional association, and boy does it show!

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    1. they are a giant database provider and publication house that masquarades as non-profit membership organization for tax purposes

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  8. Holy shit, no wonder Rudy Baum was always so chirpy in his editorials!

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  9. Whole lotta money to be made running a professional organization into the ground.

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  10. On page 66 of this tax document is another unbelievable item. Among the list of grants that ACS has made to various institutions, nearly all which are schools, there is a $19,197 'cash grant' to Chevron. WTF???? A huge oil company gets cash from the ACS? What on earth for? Even if Chevron did some grand public service for chemistry, they already have plenty of money on hand to manage that task. They don't need to take money from a 'non-profit' though I use that term loosely.

    What's next, a cash grant to ExxonMobil?

    ACS never ceases to amaze me. Thanks for going to the trouble to find and post this document.

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  11. Quite amazing that all the full time execs work the same average number of hours per week, down to the second decimal place. So obviously not a aspirational, made up number to put them in a good light at all, no no no!

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  12. Proof that the ACS is indeed a charitable organisation...and that charity clearly begins at home...

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  13. With the exeption of Mr. Massie, who is managing a profit-making organization, I suggest that all the ACS managers listed in the IRS statement and earning more than $300,000 donate the amount in excess of this amount to charity. $300,000 is more than enough to live a very comfortable lifestyle.

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