Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Got a question for a hiring manager? Linda Wang of C&EN wants to know

Got a question for a recruiter or hiring manager, but afraid to ask? Let C&EN senior editor Linda Wang ask (anonymously) for you in a new employment story. Email your questions to: l_wang -at- acs/dot/org

8 comments:

  1. How to ask about interview results if it was negative? E.g. I got interviewed I didn't receive call back: is it ok to call and ask what's wrong? on what I should work more?

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    1. I know this isn't necessarily a Q&A session here, but as someone who has sat on the other side of the desk (as interviewer), I have been advised to not make any comments outside of "We are sorry..." standard wording. Potential liability issues abound regarding hiring, and saying nothing is infinitely better than saying something that could come back to bite me.

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  2. How much weight is really given to a required experience length (e.g. 3-5 years of experience in x) compared to quality experience with x (several papers, significant development in the area, etc.)?

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    1. Depends on whether your resume gets seen by an actual scientist. More likely, it'll be either an HR drone or some airhead from Yoh, Kelly, Aerotek, etc who's only looking for keyword matches!

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  3. Another great question, I will find out. Thanks!

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  4. If you're coming straight from school (from postdoc or PhD), and the hiring manager is in a big famous company like Pfizer or BASF, what is the very first thing they look at? The name of the school or the professor, or the publications? Even if they look at everything, what is the unconscious first bias when they look at a resume? Because that might end up deciding things even after they have looked at everything else...

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  5. What distinguishes a cv that warrants a follow up from those tossed into the reject pile?
    Any helpful hints on what to include/exclude for content? Is there an optimal structure/format?

    In the interview process, are there any typical mistakes or errors interviewees make that result in a negative interview? Are there any helpful hints or tricks to turn an interview into a positive experience? What is the correct follow-up procedure?

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