Friday, December 16, 2016

Perhaps a bit overcredentialed?

I suspect this is an error, but if so, it's a funny one from Global Blood Therapeutics:
Chemistry Lab Technician 
Position Summary 
Working closely with Medicinal Chemistry, Chemoinformatics, Discovery Biology and DMPK, the technician’s primary duty is to support the daily operation of discovery research at GBT. 
Responsibilities
  • Organize chemicals and reagents
  • Organize and track GBT internal compound inventory
  • Register samples from CROs
  • Coordinate screening compound acquisition & testing
  • Coordinate shipment of compound samples for external testing
  • Dispense samples for biochemical assays and biological studies
  • Alert chemists for re-synthesis if compound stock is running low
  • Track and refill solvents for HPLCs and LCMSs...
Skills, knowledge, experience 
A bachelor or master degree in organic chemistry with 5+ years medicinal chemistry experience in a drug discovery setting
Surely this is an error. I have a very difficult time believing this is the state of the Bay Area chemistry job market that they can command a M.S. chemist for a technician position? 

5 comments:

  1. As an MS recipient, I would do it if the pay is right.

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    Replies
    1. As a PhD chemist, I would also be willing to do this.

      Delete
  2. Back when I worked in the Bay Area, most of our technicians had master's degrees, but the job requirements were more challenging than those listed above.

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    Replies
    1. The meaning of "technician" varies quite a bit between companies. Your ex-coworkers are in an unfortunate position - if they try to leave, their resumes are likely to be read by someone who thinks a technician washes beakers all day long.

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  3. I work with PhD principal scientists with relatively similar job description. It would be funny if it wasn't true...

    Non-PhD could find a cure for cancer, the story would be titled: "A technician stumble across the cure for cancer...".

    This field is out of whack, and that's why good candidates are walking away from science to become underpaid lawyers and unchallenged PCP and dentists. No wonder R&D is fleeing this country.

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