Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Reader question: where I can put my old data?

A longtime reader writes in with an interesting question:
I recently took advantage of a slow period at work to scan my part II thesis (from [CJ edit: the 80's]) and my Ph.D. thesis (from [CJ edit: the late 80s]). Both of them (and in particular my Ph.D.) contain unpublished results that may none the less be useful to someone (particularly if they are investigating [CJ edit: synthesis of a unique alkaloid], which does seem to crop up in the literature from time to time), if only to save them from repeating the same experiments. 
So my question is, do you know of a suitable place on-line to deposit such information?
I frankly have no idea, although I note that there is no chemistry Arxiv. Readers, a little help?

UPDATE: There are indeed chemistry papers on arXiv -- I thought so! Thanks, anon!

UPDATE 2: Rich Apodaca suggests figshare.com. 

5 comments:

  1. ProQuest has copies of many theses online, but it is a subscription service. I'm not sure if they would post it if you just sent it to them (there may be some sort of maintenance fee on your part), or whether you would have to go through your former institution. In any case, might be worth checking with your former institution to see if they have anything currently set up. If you are trying to post this under some type of open access model, this won't really help...

    ReplyDelete
  2. Post stuff on arxiv?
    http://proteinsandwavefunctions.blogspot.com/2012/10/finally-arxiv-for-chemistry.html

    ReplyDelete
  3. One, such an online deposit must be indexed by SciFinder, and, two, the copyright to the thesis most likely belongs to the university and they are not necessarily going to react reasonably.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Open access journals.

    All Results Journals: Chem
    http://www.arjournals.com/ojs/index.php?journal=chem

    Or even... "Journal of Contradicting Results in Science" (I should read this one more often...)

    http://jcrsci.org/

    ReplyDelete
  5. Does the PhD-granting university have an institutional repository? It's obviously been a while since the reader attended the university, but the university may still have an interest in hosting the content. More and more universities are providing this service to their researchers, usually through the university library.

    ReplyDelete