Tuesday, June 21, 2016

The weirdest thing you will see today



1. I'm not dead.
2. I don't know whether to laugh or to cry about this advanced flask scraper from ChemGlass. 

18 comments:

  1. Dude... that video was really scary to watch. I mean, I knew the flask wouldn't break since they made the video and are trying to sell the product. But still.

    I guess now I can get those extra 100mg of product out when I'm too lazy to dissolve it and transfer it to a smaller flask for evaporation.

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  2. It would seem to me that the scratches created by this thing inside the RBF would become larger and larger over time, increasing the amount of residual clinging to it, creating a further need for more rotary scratching...

    For some really valuable products, I guess the shortened life of the RBF would be worth it.

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    Replies
    1. it's a good way for chemglass to sell more RBF's

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    2. Maybe the scratches will help facilitate future crystallization in the first place? I for one would worry about ease of cleaning and possible metal particle issues with repeated usage even if willing to try in the first place.

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  3. I think I would categorize flinging a strip of chain mail in a borosilicate glass flask as "Not a recommended practice." I can envision this being used on an energetic compound to "get that last bit out" and investigating the deflagration/detonation afterwards. No thanks.

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  4. ChemGlass should use "Around and Around" as this product's theme song.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ct2n2iiiIGQ

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  5. some inventions are best left buried: A manager might see it as a great efficiency tool and try to impose innovations... But there was a stirrer of similar type, with a thin wire coil instead of a paddle, it was used for high speed stirring of molten sodium or potassium metal with mireal oil or molten wax, if you needed a freshly made fine dispersion in oil/wax

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  6. Somehow I just can't see a student in Prof Dr Klapötke's lab using one of these... At least, more than once. :=)

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  7. Do they also offer a hammer one can use to smash the flask and scrape off the product from the shards at one's leisure?

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  8. It's a nice problem to try to solve. If I didn't believe it would scratch the crap out of my lovely flasks, and if my lab had an actual drill instead of just a homeless selection of drill bits in our toolbox, I might think this was cool. Especially if they made ones for conical flasks/Erlenmeyers for those last few stubborn xtals after recrystallization.

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    Replies
    1. A brush from teflon spaghetti would work, you don't need high speed, just hand-swirling that brush inside a clamped down flask should do. If you get a tiny bit of Teflon into your silica+product for column, no problem

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  9. When I got their email the other day, I went from not knowing such a thing existed to totally wanting one in about thirty seconds. Now, there's no way I can just buying the thing, but I still want it. If only it worked on smaller flasks, say down to 100 mL.

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  10. A sonicator might do an equally good job if your compound is dry enough. Agree to the scrapping glassware threat this thing can result. Good luck selling them.

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  11. You can thank every lunatic slave-driver PI in organic synthesis (this subdiscipline seems to attract those types like a damn magnet) who insists on some asinine yield like a 99.99%.

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  12. @CJ and Forum:
    Well, this was apparently designed by "one of us"...kudos to Chemglass for entertaining innovation from its customers?
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/chem-spin-new-lab-tool-synthetic-chemists-thomas-caferro

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  13. This just does not seem to be inherently safe. Many drills produce sparks at the motor bushings, not a good combination with solvent vapors.

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    Replies
    1. A coworker had an old overhead stirrer go up in flames from solvent vapors

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  14. I have used these tools, and now I will never go back to my old bent spatulas for scraping. They work great on dry stuff when you can't use solvent to transfer. They save me a lot of time and pain. I suppose these are like any power tools - there is a right way and a wrong way to use them. A riding lawnmower can save you a lot of time and effort, but not if you drive it into a pond. These Chem-Spin scrapers work very well if the user has basic competence with tools. If not, stick with your bent spatulas..

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