Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Got a good promotion story? Share it with C&EN

Chances are, your promotion ceremony wasn't this fancy.
Credit: U.S. Army
From the inbox:
Do you have a good job promotion story to share? C&EN senior editor Linda Wang’s April 28 employment feature will offer stories on how chemists landed their promotions and offer advice on how to get promoted in this tight job market. If you have a story or advice to share, please e-mail her at l_wang@acs.org.
Help out your fellow chemists and share your story!
 

13 comments:

  1. CJ: Promotion in these days are infrequent and rare. In those good times people would ask to be promoted or else they jump ship. Not any more and people are afraid to ask. I am talking about the bench chemist and other bricklayers in major pharmaceutical companies. Keeping your job is more than promotion that you could have asked for! As for managers with MBA and such, that is different.

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    1. " As for managers with MBA and such, that is different. "

      There may be a lesson in there....

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  2. You promotion these days is to unemployment

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  3. CJ, I think you're going to struggle to find a promotion as fancy as the awarding of stars to a general. A year and a half as a civilian contractor at a US Army lab taught me that the military has a sense of occasion that very few employers can match. Sometimes, it feels a little overblown; but it does make the promotee (?) feel a bit special, which is kind of the point.

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    1. That's a fair point. I went looking for a picture of a promotion ceremony, and this is what I found. I liked the picture, which is why I used it.

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    2. I've read that change of command ceremonies (not the ones after you grounded your ship on a shoal or got caught with an illegal goat) are memorable.

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    3. The more times I see that photo, the more impressed I am. After clicking through, it looks like the woman on the left is the new general's commanding officer, and the woman on the right is his wife. How cool is that?

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  4. Its really the people that all ready have enough money who get promoted. Like full professor to reagents (or institute) professor. Or Junior Financial Analyst to Senior Financial Analyst.

    Doesn't happen to much at my "brick-layer" level.

    The days of the "american dream" are over, at least in scientific teaching and research. More like "extreme american competition in a losing race."

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  5. Fisher representative once told me: We have acetonitrile Optima grade for $300 a case of 4x4L but we will give you a 20% promotion discount.

    Oh, you mean from the management. Yes. I got a hearty handshake or pat on the back few times, but when I asked for a bonus at least in form of the stock options, they told me the money is tight and they are not allowed to give new stock option at the moment because of the Board and the negotiation with a group of investors...

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  6. Does this qualify as a good promotion story?

    Dow, DuPont CEOs to get $80 mln in "golden parachute" payouts

    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/dow-dupont-ceos-80-mln-163549365.html

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    1. Back of the envelope calculation - that's enough to pay 20 PI's salaries of $115,000 (using the example of 'Gene' just posted) for 35 years each (an entire career).

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    2. Wow, nuking your companies is really profitable. I can't wait for the trickle-down effect from this (though I suspect it will be more like a type of rain not appropriate for this blog).

      "Your parents were 'the greatest generation'. I wonder what they'll call your generation. It'll probably end in 'bag'."

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    3. I always thought Golden Parachutes were for execs who involuntarily lost their jobs because of someone else's actions. Liveris engineered this whole thing, and now he's rewarded for tearing apart his own company?

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